350 pages of criticism

Sir Alex Ferguson - Autobiography Launch

On Thursday, the autobiography of Sir Alex Ferguson was released and people started to pick apart the best bits. But what has actually come out is that the Scot criticises an awful lot of players and managers in his book. I have picked out the top three quotes from his book showing criticism and why I think they are wrong.

On Steven Gerrard:  “not a top, top player”

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This is quite possibly the most baffling thing that anyone in football has ever said. Steven Gerrard has played over 100 times for England, captained Liverpool since he was 23 and made 450 Premier League appearances.

He is a key part of both the Liverpool and England squads and how anybody could call him not a top player is beyond me.

Furthermore, what makes this statement even more ludicrous is that Sir Alex actually tried to sign Gerrard a few seasons ago. Now why would the Scot want to sign a player who he didn’t thing was capable of performing in a United side at their peak?

Many players have been quick to criticise this criticism, with Zinedine Zidane backing the Liverpool skipper by saying that “For two or three years, Steven Gerrard was the  best midfield player in the world.”

In his book Sir Alex also claimed he didn’t think of Frank Lampard as an “elite international footballer”.

On Owen Hargreaves: “He was a disaster. One of the most disappointing signings of my career. He didn’t show nearly enough determination to overcome his physical difficulties, for my liking.”

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Everyone knows that Owen Hargreaves’ career at Manchester United didn’t quite go to plan, but it wasn’t all the English midfielder’s fault.

The fact that Hargreaves lasted just a few minutes in his return from injury, probably shows something about the quality of work put in by the medical staff at Old Trafford. If Sir Alex was to criticise anybody, it should be them.

The second sentence is even more confusing. “never determined” contradicts the fact that after his release by United, he made a video for YouTube proving his fitness to potential future clubs. If this doesn’t show determination to get his career back on track, I don’t know what does.

“Liverpool wore those T-shirts supporting Suarez, which was the most ridiculous thing for a club of Liverpool’s stature”

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It was courageous to say the least that Sir Alex dedicated a whole chapter of his book to Liverpool and this is amongst the most offensive statements in it.

Yes, Suarez may have racially abused United’s Patrice Evra, but the Reds have the right to support their player as long as the FA are ok with it.

There were many times in his career that the Scot showed his support for a suspended player in interviews, yet he criticises Liverpool when they do it on a bigger scale.

In my opinion, he should keep his thoughts on this gesture to himself, but I can’t help thinking that if it was any club other than Liverpool, would he have commented on it?

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Overall, I have lost  a lot of respect for Sir Alex Ferguson after reading some of the accusations he has made in his book.

It is common in footballers’ autobiographies that some criticism is mentioned, but it seems that Fergie’s book is full of it.

I am yet to read the book itself so may change my opinion once I have done so. I am not a United fan, but to read the thoughts of one of the best – if not the best – football managers ever, will be intriguing to say the least. I doubt the book has gone down well on Merseyside though…

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